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School life in Canada.interviewing a school kid

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19 Mar 2021
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Education is compulsory up to the age of 16 in every province in Canada, except for Manitoba, Ontario, and New Brunswick, where the compulsory age is 18,[21][22][23][note 1] or as soon as a high school diploma has been achieved. In some provinces early leaving exemptions can be granted under certain circumstances at 14. Canada generally has 190 (180 in Quebec[24]) school days in the year, officially starting from September (after Labour Day) to the end of June (usually the last Friday of the month, except in Quebec when it is just before June 24 – Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day/Fête nationale du Québec). In British Columbia secondary schools, there are 172 school days during a school year. (2013-2014).[25] In Alberta, high school students get an additional four weeks off to accommodate for exam break; two weeks in January, and two in June. Classes typically end on the 15th of those two months.

The Programme for International Student Assessment coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) currently ranks the overall knowledge and skills of Canadian 15-year-olds as the sixth best in the world. Canada is a well performing OECD country in reading literacy, mathematics, and science with the average student scoring 523.7, compared with the OECD average of 493.[26][27] In 2016, the country spent 6.0 percent of its GDP on all levels of education – roughly 1.0 percentage points above the OECD average of 5.0 percent.[12] In 2017, 68 percent of Canadians aged 25 to 64 attained some form of post-secondary education, which is 24 percent above the OECD average of 44 percent.[14][15] 57 percent of Canadians aged 25 to 64 had attained a college diploma or university degree along with 11 percent of Canadians attaining certificates, diplomas, and apprenticeships from vocational institutions.[15][28] 61 percent of Canadians aged 25 to 34 attained some form of tertiary education which is also one of the highest among OECD countries, ranking second behind South Korea.[29][30][31][32][33] 31 percent of Canadians aged 25 to 64 have earned a bachelor's degree or higher, which is comparable to the OECD average of 31 percent.[34][14][35]

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Elementary, intermediate, secondary, and post-secondary education in Canada is a provincial responsibility and there are many variations between the provinces. The federal government's responsibilities in education are limited to the Royal Military College of Canada, and funding the education of indigenous peoples.


1950 Canadian School Train. Pupils attend classes at Nemegos near Chapleau, Ontario.
In 2016, 8.5% of men and 5.4% of women aged 25 to 34 had less than a high school diploma (340,000 young Canadians).[36] In many places, publicly funded high school courses are offered to the **** population. The ratio of high school graduates versus non diploma-holders is changing rapidly, partly due to changes in the labour market[37] that require people to have a high school diploma and, in many cases, a university degree. Nonetheless, more than 54.0% of Canadians have a college or university degree, the highest rate in the world.[38] The majority of schools, 67%, are co-educational.

Canada spends about 5.4% of its GDP on education.[39] The country invests heavily in tertiary education (more than US$20,000 per student).[40] Recent reports suggest that from 2006 the tuition fees of Canadian universities have increased by 40 percent.[41] Since the adoption of section 23 of the Constitution Act, 1982, education in both English and French has been available in most places across Canada (if the population of children speaking the minority language justifies it), although French Second Language education/French Immersion is available to anglophone students across Canada.

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